Introduction to this class

This is the introductory course for transpersonal psychology, its historical development and the basic tenets of selected contributing psychologies – Humanistic and Existential Psychology, Assagioli and Psychosynthesis, Jung and Analytical Psychology, and Shamanic and Mystical Traditions. The course surveys transpersonal techniques of investigation, including hypnosis, dream work, meditation, shamanic journeying, and active imagination. The course explores principles of transpersonal therapy and transpersonal coaching (contemplative psychotherapy, spiritual wounding and restoration, archetypal center core selves). The course evaluates eudaimonic growth, ego development, postconventional personality, future selves, transcendence, self-transcendence, and ego surrender.

 

Textbook: This course is an in-depth study of Hartman & Zimberoff’s book – Self-transcendence and Ego Surrender: A Quiet-enough Ego or an Ever-quieter Ego. It provides a survey of the field of transpersonal psychology, and in particular the course is focused on the potential development to optimal functioning through transcendent states and stages of consciousness, beyond ego.

 

The ten-week course divides the book into ten (10) weekly readings averaging 30 pages. There is a weekly 1 hour recorded videoconference call. A brief (one page) reflection paper will be due each week to address the impact of the weekly topic on the student’s personal experience and clinical practice (see details below).

 

Objectives for Transpersonal Psychology: Ego Transcendence

The objectives of this course are:

1.      To be able to identify and distinguish between the Four Forces of Psychology.

2.      To understand the basic principles of Humanistic and Existential Psychology, Psychosynthesis, Analytical Psychology, and Shamanic and Mystical Traditions.

3.      To have a clear understanding of the following transpersonal techniques of investigation: hypnosis, dream work, meditation, shamanic journeying, and active imagination.

4.      To appropriately distinguish between transpersonal therapy and transpersonal coaching, the principles of each and the primary methods of each.

5.      To be able to explain each of the following concepts: eudaimonic growth, ego development, postconventional personality, future selves, transcendence, self-transcendence, and ego surrender.

 

Your course faculty member provides a recorded one hour class each week. You write the Reflection papers and send them via email each week, and the instructor will comment on your Reflection and return it to you each week. The faculty member will also be available by telephone by appointment to discuss any concerns, to discuss content and ideas, to discuss your progress on the research paper, or for you to ask questions.

 

Weekly topics:

Meeting #1 – Overview and Introduction

Introduction to Transpersonal Psychology – Historical development, Relevance to modern life

Readings:

  • Self-transcendence and Ego Surrender Chapters 1-2, pages i through 20

·        Levinson – The Stages of Adult Development, pages 3-13

·        Maslow’s Qualities of Transcending Self-Actualizers

 

Meeting #2 –Transcendence and Immanence, Ascent and Descent       

Readings:

  • Self-transcendence and Ego Surrender Chapters 1-3, pages 21 through 52

·        Kalton - Green spirituality and Horizontal transcendence, pages 187-200

 

Meeting # 3  – Contributing Psychologies: Humanistic Psychology – Self-actualization, Psychosynthesis – the Transpersonal Self, Existential Psychology, Gestalt Therapy, Jung and Analytical Psychology, Wilber and Integral Psychology, Shamanic and Indigenous Traditions, Eastern Orthodox Mysticism

Readings:

  • Self-transcendence and Ego Surrender Chapter 4, pages 53-88
  • Development of ego beyond self
  • Firman - An Introduction to Psychosynthesis, pages 1-11

 

Meeting # 4 – Transcendence, Self-transcendence, and Ego Surrender

Readings:

·        Self-transcendence and Ego Surrender Chapter 5, pages 89-114

  • Grof - Brief History of Transpersonal Psychology, pages 46-54
  • Maslow - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature, pages 1-9

 

Meeting # 5 – Transpersonal Techniques of Investigation: Hypnosis, Dream Work, Meditation and Contemplative Psychotherapy, Shamanic Journeying, Active Imagination

Readings:

  • Self-transcendence and Ego Surrender Chapter 6, pages 115-142
  • Wickramasekera - Mysteries of Hypnosis and the Self Revealed, pages 330-348

 

Meeting # 6 – Transpersonal Therapy and Transpersonal Coaching

Readings:

  • Self-transcendence and Ego Surrender Chapters 7 & 8, pages 143-180
  • Law et al - Applying transpersonal coaching psychology, pages 24-32

 

Meeting # 7 – Transpersonal Psychology in Higher Education and Research

Readings:

  • Self-transcendence and Ego Surrender Chapters 9 & 10, pages 181-206
  • Fischer – Humanistic Psychology and Qualitative Research, pages 3-11

 

Meeting # 8 – Transpersonal Psychology and Optimal Functioning

Readings:

  • Self-transcendence and Ego Surrender Chapter 11, pages 207-232

·        Frederick – The Center Core in Ego State Therapy, pages 39-53

 

Meeting # 9 – Eudaimonic Growth, Ego Dev., Postconventional Personality, Future Selves

Readings:

  • Self-transcendence and Ego Surrender Chapter 12, pages 233-264
  • Bauer - How the Ego Quiets as it Grows, pages 199-210

 

Meeting # 10 – Review: The role of transpersonal psychology in today’s world

 

References (provided digitally):

Bauer, J. J. (2008). How the Ego Quiets as It Grows: Ego Development, Growth Stories, and Eudaimonic Personality Development. In Bauer, Jack J. and Wayment, Heidi A. (Eds.). Transcending self-interest: Psychological explorations of the quiet ego. Decade of behavior., (pp. 199-210). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Firman, D. (2011). Transpersonal psychology: An introduction to psychosynthesis. Retrieved from http://counselingoutfitters.com/ vistas/vistas11/Article_49.pdf

Fischer, C. T. (2006). Humanistic Psychology and Qualitative Research: Affinity, Clarifications, and Invitations. Humanistic Psychologist, 34(1), 3-11.

Frederick, C. (2014). The Center Core in Ego State Therapy and other hypnotically facilitated psychotherapies. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 56, 39–53.

Grof, S. (2008). Brief History of Transpersonal Psychology. International Journal of Transpersonal Studies, 27, 46-54.

Kalton, M. C. (2000). Green spirituality: Horizontal transcendence. In P. Young-Eisendrath and M. E. Miller (Eds.), The Psychology of Mature Spirituality, 187-200. Philadelphia, PA: Taylor & Francis Inc.

Law, H., Lancaster, B. L., & DiGiovanni, N. (June 2010). A wider role for coaching psychology –applying transpersonal coaching psychology. The Coaching Psychologist, 6(1), 24-32.

Levinson, Daniel J. A conception of adult development. American Psychologist. 1986 Jan Vol 41(1) 3-13.

Maslow, A. (1969). The Farther Reaches Of Human Nature, Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, 1(2), 1-9.

Wickramasekera II, Ian E.( Jul 2015). Mysteries of hypnosis and the self are revealed by the psychology and neuroscience of empathy. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 57(3), 330-348.

 

Optional Reading (provided digitally):

Kalff, M. (1983). The negation of ego in Tibetan Buddhism and Jungian psychology. Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, 15(2), 103-124.

Makes Marks, L. F. (2007). Great mysteries: Native North American religions and participatory visions. Revision, 29(3), 29-36.

Manners, J., & Durkin, K. (2001). A critical review of the validity of ego development theory and its measurement. Journal of Personality Assessment, 77(3), 541-567.

Markides, K. C. (2008). Eastern Orthodox mysticism and transpersonal theory. Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, 40(2), 178-198.

Mayer, M. (Jan 9, 2015). Transforming Energy Psychology into a Comprehensive, Transpersonal Psychotherapy. Retrieved from http://acepblog.org/2015/01/09/transforming-energy-psychology-into-a-comprehensive-transpersonal-psychotherapy/

Tart, C. T. (2008). Accessing state-specific transpersonal knowledge: Inducing altered states. Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, 40(2), 137-154.